Project Overview

"Among the Ruins" is an impressive twine game that layers image, text and auralization to create a sense of time, space and narrative. 

There are four stories, featuring different aspects of the history of the house and collections: the story of one of the slaves sold with two plantations to pay for the building of Clandon;  the story of a soldier, treated at Clandon during the First World War; the story of scion of the house who, after admitting his homosexuality went into self-imposed exile in France, and fathered a respected composer; and, the story of Hinemihi, the Maori meeting house in the gardens at Clandon.


The Visualization

amoungsttheruins.PNG

Paradata

Source 

Download the Game 

This is a twine game, download the folder, open it and run the html file within, Among the Ruins, in your browser.

The source file, Phoenix.tws, is attached. It opens in Twine 1.4.x NOT in Twine 2


Judges' Comments

The breath-taking audio reconstructions included within this complex project captured our judges imaginations and hearts whilst the intricate layering of narrative and interpretive contexts left them wanting more. They were hugely complimentary of the way in which the duo had structured the piece to meaningfully showcase and integrate narrative, reconstruction and data into the piece. The interactive nature of the project promoted significant discussion on the topic of agency, control and interpretation in museums and collections, making it not only a thought provoking piece in its own right, but also in relation to wider heritage themes and issues. The technicality, scale and artful nature of the project, as well as the thoughtful, comprehensive paradata far exceeded the expectations of our judges for a short-term “jam” project, leading them to crown “Among the Ruins” as the highly commended team entry for the 2015 Heritage Jam. 


Awards



About the Creators

Catriona has recently finished a PhD at Univeristy of Southampton exploring auralization and visualisation approaches to lived experience in the past. Her research interests lie in multisensory approaches to heritage places, digital methods and anything sound!

Matthew has worked in Cultural Heritage since 1985. He is currently dividing his time between working as a Visitor Experience consultant with the National Trust and studying for a PhD at Southampton University.


Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Project Overview

The prototype of "Museums and Collections" revolves around the idea of a puzzle game where the player is trying to get the artefacts out of the museum, escaping to see the real world, where the curators patrolling are attempting to stop them. The game is a playful implementation of the tension between retaining artefacts in-situ versus in collections - or in the places where the objects originate versus the structured and maintained collections. Due to time restraints the game was not able to be finished and thus what is presented here is a proof of concept prototype. 


The Visualization



Judges' Comments

The judges complimented the technical ability in the developing project and applauded the inclusion of interactive elements. The theme was clearly implemented, though some issues were raised from a museuological perspective of representing artefacts being taken from a museum. Overall the judges felt that there was a solid basis for further development and were hopeful that further paradata might shed light on the development decisions and technical aspects of the project. 


About the Creator

Peter is "a guy who codes as my day job, doing vector art outside of (and sometimes during) work, regarding heritage visualisation I met someone at a previous gamejam, made friends, and she mentioned it on her social media page, otherwise I never thought of it a thing until I just read it in the update post."

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Project Overview

During the interpretation and discussion of a site, archaeologists often attempt to evoke an atmosphere by vividly describing the possible sounds or smells, and yet it is harder for the reader to summon up the smell of something, then it is to close their eyes and see the picture of the landscape being described by the words. But smell, when directly experienced, has the ability to invoke intense feelings, memories and emotions. Dead Man's Nose is an innovative implementation of smell to historic interpretation - utilising an often ignored sense to provide a truly novel experience of the past.


The Visualization




Judges' Comments

The judges were absolutely in awe of how innovative Stu’s project was. They revelled in the opportunity to engage with the past through new media-forms, distribution platforms and senses and commented that this was a project that truly embodied the spirit of the Heritage Jam by providing a thoroughly impressive, novel and engaging way to interact with museums and collections. In addition to this the judges felt that the paradata provided was of an exemplary standard – indeed the only complaint that could be levelled at either the project or the paradata was that the judges wanted to know even more about how it works and to try it out for themselves! Due to the truly innovative nature of the project, the high technical capacity demonstrated in creation and implementation and the thorough nature of the paradata the judges decided to award this project the highly-commended individual award. 


Awards



About the Creator

Stuart Eve has been a commercial archaeologist with L – P : Archaeology since 2000, during which time he has been lucky enough to also complete a PhD looking at the convergence of phenomenological fieldwork with GIS analysis, specifically using Mixed Reality techniques. He is very interested in multisensory approaches to the study of past people, and also investigating how Mixed Reality may be used in archaeological fieldwork.


Acknowledgements

My family Anna, Wilfred and Edwin for appearing in the video and also putting up with the smells of Cannibal Cave and Man O' War. My dad, Roger Eve, for teaching me how to solder and for building the wooden smell boxes. I have used a number of tutorials as inspiration for the project, such as the various code examples at https://github.com/RedBearLab/iOS, www. ollyfactory.com/, www.raywenderlich.com/95014/ geofencing - ios-swift, www.creativebloq.com/ipad/get-started- geofencing - ios-9122867. Finally, thanks to my partners and colleagues at L – P : Archaeology for giving me the time and space to develop crazy projects like this.

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Project Overview

This video showcases processes undertaken by archaeologists turning artefacts into
‘data’: from excavation and washing, to cataloguing and storage. In doing so we aim to
juxtapose the thousands of objects found through excavation and the select number which
become part of a museum collection, and consider how choices in display and storage
shape the perception of archaeological material. While the analytical value of artefacts
‘in bulk’ is widely appreciated, their potential for communicating heritage narratives is
often overlooked, as well as their aesthetic value.


The Visualization




Judges' Comments

Our judges absolutely adored the way in which “Team Dialogue with a Fish” took pottery sherds – items which, due to their plentiful nature and often repetitive form, tend to be thought of as uninspiring artefacts – and transformed them into inspiring and exciting pieces in a clever narrative. The upbeat music complimented the implementation of comedy and narrative perfectly, creating a vibe which had our judges and viewers wanting to engage with this collection further. The creative way which the team reimagined this collection as well as the incredible technical execution in the video media form led to our judges selecting this entry as one of the highly deserving recipients of the “Judges’ Choice” awards. 


Awards



About the Team

Dialogue with a Fish are a team of archaeologists currently working in Barda, Azerbaijan
with the Archaeological Exploration of Barda project (part of the Nizami Ganjavi
Programme for the Languages and Cultures of Azerbaijan and the Caucasus, University of
Oxford: www.orinst.ox.ac.uk/nizami-ganjavi).

Alexis Pantos is an independent photographer, designer and archaeologist based in York.
He has worked on projects from Somerset to Jordan and enjoys photographing several
thousand pot sherds at short notice.


Paul Wordsworth is a research fellow at the Oriental Institute, University of Oxford.
Working mainly in Central Asia thus far, Paul has recently branched out across the Caspian
into the Caucasus where he has been pleasantly surprised by the quality of the plov.


David Stone is an environmental archaeologist who has recently completed an MSt at the
University of Oxford. He’s not quite sure how he ended up in Azerbaijan… but can
recommend the spuds.


Tim Penn is mid-way through a Masters in Classical Archaeology at the University of
Oxford. His highlight of this year (so far) was attending Ginger Fest 2015 in Breda,
Netherlands.


Cordelia Hall is a freelance archaeologist and archaeological surveyor. She worked in
London for several years before heading to the Middle East, for the sunshine and excellent
cuisine.


Katie Campbell is part-way through and MSc in Digital Heritage at the University of York.
She has worked on projects across Europe and Asia, trying (and failing) to adopt a dog in
each country.


Acknowledgements

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Project Overview

'Cryptoporticus' is one of the Latin words that can be interpreted as 'gallery'. But not a public gallery - a private or hidden one - like a cloister. It is, on purpose, difficult to access. But, once admitted, it surrounds the visitor with a sense of belonging. The game thus places the player within an initially empty and hostile architecture. It is composed of endless galleries and passages, all empty and without any guidance. The museum does not welcome the player's intrusion. 

But after some experience with the building the player will notice patterns and symbols. The player will begin to engage with the building; will begin to learn its internal language. Eventually, the player and the building will cooperate and the museum will reveal its collections. 


The Visualisation



Judges' Comments

“Inspiring” was the word that all three of our judges used to describe this evocative piece, commenting in turn how emotionally engaging, thought provoking and visually stunning the piece is. The judges quite simply couldn’t believe the scope of what had been achieved and marvelled at the way which the flow of the game took you on a journey from the cold, distant façade of museums into a warm, personal and reflexive space. They complimented the way which the museum was designed to not only host collections, but in a way, to itself become a collection, encouraging the player to reflect on the relationships and dynamics at play in the space. In addition the paradata provided was of an exemplary standard, leading our judges to crown this masterpiece as the winner of our individual, online participation category. 


Awards



About the Creator

Anthony Masinton is Digital Research Fellow in the Centre for the Study of Christianity and Culture at the University of York Department of History. He builds 3d models of churches and cathedrals, develops mobile apps for said churches and cathedrals, and does a bit of freelance moonlighting in digital humanities. For years he taught and researched digital heritage at the University of York Department of Archaeology – which he remembers fondly. Though based in York he currently lives in a tiny town at the foot of the Spanish Peaks in southern Colorado. (Google ‘Spanish Peaks’ – they’re awesome. Seriously.) 

Anthony is trying to come to grips with social media. He’ll be your friend on Facebook and he sometimes tweets at amasinton. 


Acknowledgements

Anthony gives high-fives to all Open Access data providers – particularly the Archaeology Data Service, National Gallery of Art, Stanford 3d Scanning Repository, and the contributors to freesound.org

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Project Overview

The  "Völund Stones: Weland the Smith" is a work in progress. It is the cover artwork and opening pages of an eight page comic retelling the story of Weland the Smith. This project draws on a collection of early medieval artefacts and carvings in order to retell the story of Weland (or Völundr) the smith. 


This retelling emphasises the complexity of the smith’s identity including his cyborgian character as a transformer of things and a transformer of self. The project also draws attention to the monstrous, material and artefactual components inhered with Weland’s identity as his story was adapted and distributed in the early medieval world. 


This is achieved in comic-strip format, representing an original style of retelling the story which aims to be widely comprehensible and engaging. The original idea, artwork and design is the work of cartoonist and archaeologist Hannah Kate Sackett. Archaeologist Howard Williams provided suggestions and guidance on the re-telling’s literary and material dimensions, relating to his on-going research on the Past in its Place project funding by the European Research Council.


The Visualization



Judges' Comments

The judges were blown away by the carefully considered interplay between the source material and the artistic representation through the comic media form. They complimented the playful but purposeful art-style and highly praised how accessible heritage information was when presented in this captivating way. The composition, thematic integration, resonance and potential for impactful implementation of the pieces in the real-world particularly stood out to our judges who are all sincerely looking forward to seeing how this project develops in the future. The quality and depth of the paradata likewise stood out as exemplary - being written in a way which was at once informative, fun and engaging for a wide array of audiences, leading our judges to crown this piece as the winner of the online team jam for 2015. 


Awards



About the Creators

Professor Howard Williams
Howard Williams is Professor of archaeology at the University of Chester. His research interests include death, burial and commemoration. He is currently working with archaeologists, literary scholars, geographers and historians to rethink the relationship between story and place in the English and Welsh landscape ass part of the ERC-funded Past in its Place project,

Hannah Kate Sackett
Hannah Kate Sackett works as a cartoonist ad freelance educator. Her background in archaeology has led to an interest in communicating archaeological research through the creation of comics. She is especially interested in exploring the potential of prehistoric and historic art forms in communication ideas about the past.
You can find out more about her work here:
prehistories.wordpress.com
hannahkatesackett.wordpress.com

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Project Overview

Phalanx is a sleek piece of vector artwork inspired by the greek collections at a plethora of museums. The Visualization, created by Peter Martingell, features layers of soldiers, with spears held aloft, who are flanked by the artifacts of war. At their feet a band inspired by the pottery patterns so often seen amongst greek collections at museums can be seen. 


The Visualization



Judges' Comments

The judges enjoyed the aesthetic of the visualisation – especially the bold colours, visual cohesion and implementation of the pottery pattern. It was further commented that the piece was an interesting take on the theme which required careful observation to unpack the layers fully. 


About the Authour

Peter is "A guy who codes as my day job, doing vector art outside of (and sometimes during) work, regarding heritage visualisation I met someone at a previous gamejam, made friends, and she mentioned it on her social media page, otherwise I never thought of it a thing until I just read it in the update post."

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Project Overview

This is the first ever Heritage Jam project about jam! Howard shot a vlog (video-blog) over 3 days of exploring jam at heritage sites and monuments during annual leave with his  family in North and South-West Wales. He has supported this endeavour with posts on my Archaeodeath blog. The result is a light-hearted attempt to create a ‘jam Heritage Jam’ vlog that reflects on different dimensions of the relationship between heritage and conserves.


The Visualization



Judges' Comments

This creative and original take on the theme had our judges in stitches. They commented that the inclusion of personal narrative alongside generous amounts of humour made the entry thoroughly engaging and enjoyable. The judges commented that the heritage visualisation practice is so often conducted in rather formal ways and that the choice to leverage comedy was appreciated and refreshing. After a brief review it was concluded that this was indeed the first Heritage Jam entry to include actual jam – a fact which the judges appreciated immensely. 


About the Creator

Howard Williams has, over the last decade, sought to promote and research archaeology’s public and community engagements in my research and writing as well as through teaching. In doing so, he has focused on public dimensions of archaeologies of death, burial and commemoration of the medieval, post-medieval and contemporary pasts (e.g. Williams and Williams 2007; Williams 2007; 2009; 2010; Williams and Giles forthcoming). Building on this interest, from June 2013, he haswritten a Wordpress blog entitled Archaeodeath exploring archaeology, mortality and material culture. This has, in turn, inspired him to start reflecting on mortuary archaeology’s digital engagements, including blogging and vlogging, in publications (Meyers and Williams 2014; Tong et al. 2015; Williams and Atkin forthcoming). Both blog and vlogs occasionally attempt to use humour to convey archaeological concepts and issues (see comments by Marwick 2015).


Acknowledgements

I am very grateful to Dr Patricia Murrieta-Flores and Javier Pereda who compiled my videos for me and refined the sound and graphics. I owe them at least one pot of conserve each! Thanks also go to Libby, Jemimah, Adah, Tobias, Talitha and Rhoda Williams who suffered my conserve conversations and behaviours through 3  exhausting consecutive days of the project.

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Project Overview

Archaeological Collections is a sketch delivered hot from the field.  The sketch is derived from Jens' work in southeastern Turkey at the Neolithic site of Göbekli Tepe. The piece captures a collection of archaeological tools and processes as well as striking collections of ducklings all in a row as they are excavated from the site. 


The Visualization



Judges' Comments

The judges enjoyed the way which the image captures a resonant, charming, personal and reflexive moment in both the physical archaeological process and the process of representation. They were particularly engaged with the way in which the makers hand was evident in the piece. The judges also praised the personal nature of the paradata and the way which both the image and the paradata generated a nostalgic feeling - transporting the viewer into the shoes and perspective of the creator, if just for a moment. The warm and charming nature of the visualisation led one of our judges to comment that “for an archaeologist this kind of image is paradise” – high praise which highlights the important role personal and creative elements can have in archaeological visualisation practices. 


About the Creator

My name's Jens and I'm an archaeologist based in Berlin, currently working at the Orient Department of the German Archaeological Institute - well, right now at the Göbekli Tepe excavations in Turkey to be more precise, as already mentioned above.

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Project Overview

Virginia Archaeology: On the Map is an initial sketch of an idea for plotting RSS and article feeds onto a geolocational map. Presented here is the start of a work in progress as time and download restrictions mean the project could not be fully realised. Check out the source files, hosted on GitHub, and be sure to check out the paradata for more on how this project is noped to develop in the months following the jam!


The Visualization

Presented above is a static image from the in development project. Be sure to follow the links for the source code and paradata to find out more!

Presented above is a static image from the in development project. Be sure to follow the links for the source code and paradata to find out more!



Judges' Comments

The judges praised the ambition of the work and the potential of the outcome to be a catalyst for public advocacy and involvement in wider archaeological communities. Whilst the project was unfinished the judges praised the technicality evidenced so far, complimented the way which Jolene had challenged herself to learn new skills during creation (a cornerstone of the Heritage Jam practice), and hoped that further development would occur so this fantastic prototype could be realised to its potential. 


About the Creator

Jolene is the Archaeology Inventory Manager (I wrangle site-level data) for the Virginia Department of Historic Resources, where I’ve been since 2008. Recently, I’ve found myself diving headfirst into the digital humanities deep end as part of the Institute on Digital Archaeology Method and Practice. I’m interested in learning new ways to visualize the amazing dataset I have at my fingertips. I’m on Twitter and GitHub as @aejolene.

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Project Overview

Epi.Curio is a digital collection of images and recipes – openly available and accessible to stimulate engagement with heritage in experiential and engaging ways. Individuals are encouraged to bake their own collections, a creative and delicious alternative to previous practices of antiquities collecting (given the ethical concerns with the antiquities trade, repatriation, and private, inaccessible collections). Inspired by the important work of many historians and archaeologists of past foodways, as well as more Blumenthalian approaches to gastronomy, Epi.Curio is to be an approachable and inventive resource, one that engages body and mind; the edible objects also remind us that heritage is fleeting, and needs to be maintained in diverse ways. See the live EpiCurio here. 


The Visualization

Please note that these are static images - please visit the live website to see the full scope of the project!



Judges' Comments

Our judges loved this tasty project – commenting that it promoted not only a new way to engage with existing collections, but through creating its own collection, provided a novel way for a vast array of people from across the heritage discipline, general public as well as further abroad to create and curate in entirely novel and engaging ways. The cohesion between the way in which the theme was interpreted and implemented alongside the clarity of paradata and technical capability (both with digital technologies and baking!) stood out to our judges, leading to this outcome being selected as a judges choice award for our online jam. 


Awards



About the Creator

Katherine Cook is a PhD student in the Department of Archaeology at the University of York, and lives in Hamilton, Canada. Her research combines ethnography, material and landscape analysis, and digital technologies to explore historical periods, particularly death, commemoration and identity in the transatlantic worlds of Canada, the Caribbean, and the United Kingdom. 


Acknowledgements

Many thanks to those who ate the bounty of artifacts that I collected in my kitchen this week, and commented on the design and visualisations for this project (particularly Chrissy Taylor). I also appreciate my current involvement and mentorship at the Institute for Digital Archaeology at the University of Michigan, which has sparked a great deal of my interest in digital heritage, and given me some of the skills to muddle through the web-based element of this project. 

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Project Overview

"Eldrich Study" is an artistic interpretation and render of a cabinet of curiosity from the early 1900's. Due to a cross-continental relocation the study remains unfinished but the rummaged draws and exposed objects hint at the engaged, exciting and intensity that the personal collections held in cabinets of curiosity can illicit. Further development is proposed in the future.  The study can also be interacted with here. 


The Visualization



Judges' Comments

The judges were struck by the immediate recognisability of the work and the mood which it managed to set despite the relative simplicity of the scene. They thoroughly appreciated the artistic merit and technical capability displayed in the work and complimented the sense of curiosity it evoked, stipulating that they would love the ability to jump into the scene to explore it more. The judges further complimented the conscientious research Byron had done at various museums during construction and appreciated the opportunity to engage with the creative practice and outcomes of those external to the heritage profession. 


About the Creator

G Byron WIlliams is an (very recently) Australian based environment artist for video-game projects. 

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Project Overview

"Step into the Past" is a watercolour painting inspired by the collections of Flag Fen living museum. The painting features reconstructions (causeway and boat), objects from the museum (a golden ring, a wooden wheel, bronze age sword and beaker pottery) and flora (Flag) from the region, drawing the viewers attention to the diversity and intrigue of this fabulous collection.


The Visualization


Paradata (In Poem Form!)


Judges' Comments

Our judges commented that the painting was immediately recognisable; complimenting Lynn on the way she had truly captured the dynamic and warm feeling of the site. The holistic nature of the composition, hand of the maker and personal flair which permeates the piece garnered special praise, as did truly original way which the paradata (which came in the form of a poem) wove an intricate narrative between modern, archaeological perspectives of the site, the personal experiences of the creator and the past imaginary. The judges commented that whilst new technologies and digital creations can yield wonderful results, sometimes the older artistic mediums, such as the use of watercolour in this case, can evoke ideas, capture experiences or render emotive engagements in different ways. 


About the Creator

Lynn is a primary school educator with a passion for the past and painting. 


Acknowledgements

Lynn would like to thank the Flag Fen museum group for their commitment to making the past come alive, for maintaining such a beautiful collection and for being the inspiration and source material for this implementation of her artistic pursuits. 

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Project overview

"Visualising the Locations of Children's Literature" is a collage created by Daisy Johnson as a way to show the collection of locations involved in her ongoing PhD research. The piece shows entries for "The Whitby Witches", pulled from the database of locations that underpins the research, alongside further images of importance to the real world locations of children's literature.  


The Visualization



Judges' Comments

Our judges were delighted to receive another entry from outside of the heritage sector and were highly complimentary of the way in which Daisy had taken a subject, so often tied purely to words, and turned it into an engaging visual graphic. The judges felt that the paradata provided gave additional layers of meaning to the work and hoped that more reflexive practices, in a similar vein, between the written word and visual representation could be produced for research purposes in the future. 


About the Creator

Daisy is a PhD candidate with the University of York, researching children's literature and literary tourism. She blogs at http://didyoueverstoptothink.wordpress.com and http://bigbootsandadventures.wordpress.com.

 

 

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick
2 CommentsPost a comment

Project Overview

"Listening to Watling Street" is Dr. Shawn Graham's experiment into sonifying the digital representation of the past - translating what we traditionally see and formalise onto a shelf in a museum or a database into a series of both pleasant and discordant notes, allowing us to explore an unseen experience of the Roman world. Within the song you hear crecendoes and dimuendoes that reflect concentrated areas in the archaeological record - literally allowing the inscriptions to speak to the listener, opening a new, dynamic door for understanding the Roman past. 




Judges' Comments

The judges were absolutely captivated by the brilliant subversion of what is traditionally a highly visual form of representation into a rhythmic soundscape, commenting that it opened up a totally new way to see and think about the past. The novel, insightful nature of the work, the innovative implementation of audio and visual media forms, combined with the clarity and thoroughness of the paradata led the judges to select this piece as one of three judges' choice awards for the online jam, stipulating that they would very much like to see the method discussed in the paradata expanded to include further imagery and for more implementations to be produced. 


Awards



About the Creator

Shawn Graham, Associate Professor of Digital Humanities in the Department of History at Carleton University. Shawn likes to think of himself as a Romanist, and quite possibly, an archaeologist of Roman landscapes and social spaces. His digital archaeology work often turns on questions of simulation and the best ways to represent these things in everything from interactive fiction to virtual worlds. He's into data mining archaeological datasets, and has a book coming out soonish on digital methods in history with Ian Milligan and Scott Weingart.


Acknowledgements

I can't thank Brian Foo enough. His experiments in sonification, and his committment to sharing his code and expertise are exemplary. You too can play with this code to generate your own sonified experience of space - see Foo's Github repo at https://github.com/beefoo/music-lab-scripts

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Project Overview

"Museums in the Caribbean" is collaborative visualization project between Csilla Ariese-Vandemeulebroucke & Krijn Boom. Krijn and Csilla created the stunning graphic by layering images captured during research and intersecting them across a constructed cultural-heritage skyline to showcases the diversity, vibrance and beauty of Caribbean Museums . The visualization was concieved of as a way to introduce, represent and communicate Csilla's ongoing doctoral research with further reaching possibilities for use as a postcard or poster within the Caribbean museum community. 


The Visualization

Click on the image to be taken to a high resolution larger version of the project in which you can observe the fantastic detailing. 

Click on the image to be taken to a high resolution larger version of the project in which you can observe the fantastic detailing. 



Judges' Comments

The judges praised the striking and eye-catching nature of the graphic, highlighting how the simplicity of form straddled surprisingly complex layers of meaning which could only be extracted upon closer inspection. One of the key points of praise was the clearly stated research questions within the paradata document and how the graphic meaningfully answered these questions, not only for Csilla’s research, but also the wider museum community of the Caribbean. The potential for the graphic to have on-going, real-world implementations, was highly praised by the judges who look forward to seeing how this project is developed and deployed in the future. 


About the Creators

Csilla Ariese-Vandemeulebroucke is a PhD researcher at Leiden University. Within the NEXUS1492 project, she is studying museums in the Caribbean and how they engage with communities. Before that, she did an MSc in Museum Studies and a BA in Archaeology (specialized in maritime archaeology). Although she is deeply immersed in heritage and takes a lot of photos, she doesn't really have much experience with heritage visualization. She does love collecting pretty postcards, especially when visiting museums.

Krijn Boom is a PhD researcher at Leiden University. Before finishing both his BA and MA in Archaeology (specialization: Heritage Management), Krijn successfully studied Multimedia Design and Communication Management in Utrecht. Krijn’s ultimate interest lies at the intersection of these studies; a passion that he fulfills not only in his PhD, but also in his job as graphic designer at CommonSites. Right at the nexus of design, communication and archaeology lies, he believes, the future of archaeology. At the moment, Krijn is involved in the European NEARCH project which aims to study and renew interactions between archaeology and (local) communities.
 

Csilla & Krijn are also both founding members of VALUE, a research group focused on the intersection of videogames and archaeology. They discuss theoretical archaeological concepts in relation to games. Sometimes they stream these games, sometimes they just all come together and have pizza and play around.


Acknowledgements

We are indebted to the existence of all the museums in the Caribbean and thank 69 of them for participating in this project with their picture-perfect facades.


Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick