Project Overview

"Augmented Collections" uses unique code markers to generate 3D rendered models of display pieces on devices such as smartphones and tablets through an executable file, provided an Augmented Reality (AR) for the user. The nature of the resource being grounded in the digital sphere to create an Augmented Reality allows for the creation of a more informative, interactive, and comparative experience than the relatively narrow initial goal of this resource. Some key examples of this that we have looked at over the course of the project have included: screen overlays that provide information that is relevant to and explanatory of the object that is being displayed by a particular marker, the ability to display multiple objects simultaneously and tab between several objects based on the same marker in order to create a comparative experience and understand the development of objects, i.e. pots,  both geographically (and contemporaneously) and chronologically.


The Visualization




Judges' Comments

Our judges were immediately struck by the potential “Augmented Collections” has for implementation in large data-sets (such as those hosted by the ADS) as a 3D model viewer as well as for implementation on the museum floor (such as at Yorkshire Museum) as a way to augment the artefacts behind the glass cases into the real world. The former of these implementations answers a very real research question relating to accessibility and use of 3D models whilst the latter might provide a novel form of interaction between museum staff, artefact and visitor. Though the outcome is still very much in a prototype phase our judges were excited by the potential impacts mentioned in the detailed paradata that such a project might have in multiple areas of the heritage profession, thus leading to this project being awarded the highly commended position for our in-person jam. 


Awards



About the Creators

Luke Botham is a game designer working in the AAA sector. He has an interest in interactive media and game design for heritge applications. 

Mathew Fisher is a recent Masters student at St Andrews - studying Roman archaeology. He has an interest in game development and implementation for heritage studies. 

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Project Overview

Happy gods is a video-game which revolves around exploring the role of gods, offerings and religion in Roman York. The Ivory Bangle Lady - Lucia - guides you through the museum's collections to find hints and clues on how to keep the gods happy! If you make the right offering for the gods they will become happier, but if you don't do your research first and make the wrong offerings the gods will become sad, or even angry. You begin with only one god - Genius - but once you have satisfied him with offerings more gods will unlock. 


The Visualization




Judges' Comments

“Happy Gods” impressed our judges on so many levels – the scope, scale and technical capability of the project, the incredible 3D and 2D artwork and the impressively insightful and engaging integration with museum artefacts in the real-world to name but a few of the long list of features which were complimented and commented on by the judges. The game truly exceeded every possible expectation our judges had going in to the event and thus the outcome truly is a testament to the creativity, innovation and skill of each team member. The outcome masterfully answered the real world question and need for engagement and interaction with museum audiences in new ways, whilst the creation of the website facilitated remote participation and opened the doors for potential integration with the developing data-set of the Yorkshire Museum. To this end the “Happy Gods” project challenged and developed the frameworks for heritage visualisation, thus embodying and exemplifying the foundational principles of the Heritage Jam, leading to it being unanimously named the winner for the 2015 in-person jam.  


Awards



About the Creators

Sam is a post-doctoral researcher at the University of York, currently working on a project called New Economic Models and Opportunities for digital Games (NEMOG). Sam brings programming fu and extensive knowledge of Serious Gaming!

Matthew is studying for a PhD in Digital Narrative and Cultural Heritage at University of Southampton. He also works for the National Trust. He brings storytelling and spacial design skills to the team.  

Edwige is Professor of Digital Arts at UVSQ (CHCSC/IUT de Vélizy) currently working with Port Royal des Champs. She brings 3D arts and graphic programming and lots of heritage visualisation experience, to the team, and that all important French accent. 

Juan is a game designer, artist and researcher. Studying Histortical Respresentation in Games at the University of Salford, where he also teaches computer and video game development. Brings art, code and sexiness to the team.

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Project Overview

Discovering Eboracum is an ambitious app designed during the in-person Heritage Jam to help people to discover York Roman History through the collections displayed at the Yorkshire Museum and sites around the city. The Discovering Eboracum App is available as a native app for iOS and Android users, via the publicly available Situate app. It is aimed mainly at  families and tourists.


The Visualization

The above images demonstrate screen-shots of the app in action - check out the paradata and further information sections below for more!



Judges' Comments

Our judges could not believe the incredibly impressive depth and breadth of content the team had managed to implement into this GPS driven app over the course of just 48 hours. More than this, however, they were impressed with the artful way the team had woven the artefacts of the Yorkshire Museum into the wider York landscape and context through several layers of narrative. The app, which uses GPS and iBecon tracking, demonstrated an incredible level of technical capability and interpretive depth whilst the exemplary paradata clearly established the need, context and use for the outcome, leading to “Discovering Eboracum” being awarded the Highly Commended position for the 2015 in-person jam. 


Awards



About the Creators

Valeria Cambule

Valeria is an Italian graduated in Cultural Heritage Sciences, who is now starting a MSc in Digital Heritage at the University of York. She has been involved as a volunteer in several archaeological and cultural heritage projects and museum family activities.

Stephen Elliott

Stephen Elliott runs Llama Digital in Sheffield, UK. Llama Digital has developed Situate - an online system that allows venues to create and manage location-aware mobile apps (using iBeacons and GPS) for self-guided tours. Llama is currently working with a number of museums and galleries.

Patricia Smith

Pat is a mature student, who has just arrived in York to begin full-time study in Archaeological Information Systems.  Pat has a number of years’ experience as a Project Manager working on IT projects, and she has also been involved as a volunteer in archaeological projects in Europe and in Central America.  Pat has travelled widely; she began her career in the UK, and subsequently she has lived and worked in Germany, Belgium, Switzerland and the United States. 

Laura Varley

Laura is an undergraduate student at the University of Leeds, studying History and English Literature. She is currently on a year's placement with Leeds Museums and Galleries as a curator's assistant. She has volunteered at various museums and taken part in several youth outreach projects.

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Project Overview

"Shelf 83" is a clever implementation of QR codes and Soundcloud links to make the books on shelf 83 at the Yorkshire Museum able to be read and listened to without having to move the delicate artifacts. 


The Visualization



Judges' Comments

Our judges complimented the brilliant integration of a well-established low-impact digital technology (QR codes) to solve a real-world problem in an elegant and efficient way. The integration with google-books and sound-cloud was highly praised as a way to make the volumes accessible to a wide array of audiences, furthermore, it was noted by our judges that whilst the QR codes would be exceptionally useful for providing museum attendees access to the books in-situ there was also the exciting potential to (as has been done in the picture) reconstruct the library for access online, or alternatively to curate the books into different arrangements in a digital space.  The clarity of the paradata combined with the elegant simplicity and potential for real-world impact led our judges to present “Shelf 83” with a “Highly Commended” award for the 2015 Heritage Jam. 


Awards



About the Creator

I am a collaborative doctoral student with the University of York and the National Archives studying information seeking and the design of digital systems to better support archival research. Prior to commencing my doctoral work in 2012, I worked for six years in Education and Outreach at the National Archives, where I organised the Archives’ first hack day (Hack on the Record), created and ran the @ukwarcabinet twitter project and brought the Archives into Flickr Commons. I also collaborated with Wikimedia UK on the ‘This Means War’ project to digitise WWII propaganda.

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick
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