(Remote Team Jam Day Entry - Members of this team collaborated from their respective locations during the day of the Jam.)

We envisaged a resource which allowed young people to learn (almost intuitively) about 'burial' as a complex politically loaded concept but ultimately grounded in the subtleties of particular stories and materials.


About 'Time soon will bring me to the tomb'

From the moment of digital introduction, the far-flung members of this team sparked.  Ideas and images, visions and personal stories flowed.  The team focused on the many-layered but interwoven nature of burial, discovery and re-interpretation.  The concept of a book as an interactive work of sculpture, centred (literally) on the story of a single person and a single place quickly developed.  It was a privilege to witness the powerful flow of ideas amongst the team members as each brought their own experiences and talents to bear upon the Jam theme.  We hope that this fascinating idea eventually moves from concept to completion!


'Time soon will bring me to the tomb' - Early prototype sketch - Alastair Somerville

'Time soon will bring me to the tomb' - Concept sketch - Gavin MacGregor

Early 19th century embroidery sampler, by Sarah E... Cuckow.  The memento moro verse reads 'What thou’s afflictions storm be long/ Yet with this life t’will cease/ Time soon will bring me to the tomb/ Where I shall rest in peace' - Material inspiration for 'Time soon will bring me to the tomb' - Image provided by Luba Nurse

Chalice box showing pest infestation damage and decay - Material inspiration for 'Time soon will bring me to the tomb' - Image provided by Luba Nurse

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AuthorIan Kirkpatrick
Voices Recognition is an app designed to augment one’s interaction with York Cemetery, its spaces and visible features, by giving a voice to the invisible features that represent the primary reason for the cemetery’s existence: accommodation of the bodies buried underground.


About Voices Recognition

Voices Recognition is ambitious in scope and stunning in its execution.  The team prototyped a website, an app, composed a series of dramatic monologues and produced over ten minutes of video in two short films all in the single day of the Jam.  Each component complements the others, the whole working together to visualise and auralise the interwoven layers of lives in York Cemetery in an utterly compelling way.  The group’s work is a testament to the power of bringing together individuals of many backgrounds and talents and setting their collective creativity loose in a single, intense day of collaboration.  The heritage world should be beating a path to this group’s door!


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AuthorIan Kirkpatrick
A cemetery is where we commune with the dead.
Our dead. Our ancestors. We know them. They were like us.
But with time, everything fades. Colour goes. Stories forgotten. We forget to tend to them when we stop remembering them. The little gifts we leave for the ones we do, blow away, and will be forgotten too.


About 'A cemetery is where we commune with the dead'

The team sketched out not one, but a series of visualisations, focusing on the intertwined, long-term relationships within cemeteries between the living and the dead, permanence and change.  They were driven by the above/below-ground tension of cemeteries, finding this tension between the fleeting impermanence of memorials with the long, slow process of dissolution in the unseen, subterranean depths.  No single approach would suffice to express the potency of these relationships, so the team collaborated on a series of possible approaches, eventually inverting the visualisation/paradata relationship itself, producing a single, text document as the visualisation and a series of visualisations as its paradata.


A Cemetery is Where We Commune With the Dead - Pat Reynolds, Casto Vocal, Alice Watterson and Kelvin Wilson

A Cemetery is Where We Commune With the Dead - Pat Reynolds, Casto Vocal, Alice Watterson and Kelvin Wilson

A Cemetery is Where We Commune With the Dead - Pat Reynolds, Casto Vocal, Alice Watterson and Kelvin Wilson

A Cemetery is Where We Commune With the Dead - Pat Reynolds, Casto Vocal, Alice Watterson and Kelvin Wilson

A Cemetery is Where We Commune With the Dead - Pat Reynolds, Casto Vocal, Alice Watterson and Kelvin Wilson

A Cemetery is Where We Commune With the Dead - Pat Reynolds, Casto Vocal, Alice Watterson and Kelvin Wilson

A Cemetery is Where We Commune With the Dead - Pat Reynolds, Casto Vocal, Alice Watterson and Kelvin Wilson

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AuthorIan Kirkpatrick
Anekantavada is our catch-word for the multiple narratives, individual perspectives, partial truths, and personal observations, that we shared.


About 'Anekantavada'

The team member’s diverse backgrounds, training and talents resonated powerfully with the depth and variety of their response to their visit to York Cemetery.  The ‘many-pointedness’ of this experience was expressed in the Jain idea of Anekantavada and found voice in the Four Quartets of TS Eliot.  Together this found expression in a visualisation which explored the multi-vocality of the cemetery, finding its finest expression in snippets of Eliot combined with the resurrecting power of RTI.


Click here to download the complete Anekantavada presentation


Anekantavada - Eliot and RTI - Katie Campbell, Kat Foxton, Mary Garrison and Clara Molina Sanchez

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AuthorIan Kirkpatrick
The Language of Memory is an attempt to distill the vocabulary of funerary monuments into the essence of commemoration.  We combined specific inscriptions from York Cemetery with a database of inscriptions from Mout St Lawrence Cemetery, Limerick as maps and word clouds, with the final product being a single gravestone expressing the complete range of memorial language over two centuries.


About 'The Language of Memory'

Building on their shared experience visiting York Cemetery and imagining the stories behind the epitaphs and the monuments there, this group set themselves the task of visualising the subtleties of the language of commemoration.  The group blended qualitative and quantitative methods of analysis, uniting two cemetery datasets to produce a series of map and word-based visualisations.  By the end of the Jam day the team’s efforts coalesced into a single, gripping image condensing the entire vocabulary of commemoration into a ‘monument of monuments’.  It is at once statistical analysis, visualisation, record and poetry.  It rewards close attention and whispers with the voices of thousands seeking to preserve the memories of their loved ones over the centuries.



The Language of Memory - The dictionary of commemoration - Rachel Asquith, Jen Bartlett, Sarah Austin and Joe Savage

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AuthorIan Kirkpatrick