Overview

"The Journey of Bones in New Zealand" is a triptych showing the spiritual journey taken through the bone necklaces of New Zealand. Stage 1 "the Wharenui" engages with the bones of the ancestors, Stage 2 is called "The Heart of the Forest" in which the unfurling of natural wisdom happens. The final stage, Stage 3, is called "The Washing of the Spirit with Tears". 


The Visualization



Judges Comments

The technical and artistic aspect of this work was highly commended by our panel of judges. The first of our judges - Paul Backhouse - really liked "the interpretation of the theme and the inspiration behind it". Matthew Tyler-Jones further added that he "likes the simple mixed media approach" which was echoed by judges Ian Kirkpatrick and Imran Ali who commented that this is an "innovative interpretation of theme, perhaps of a cultural area that isn't widely known. Aesthetically, well crafted and exectuted with interesting addition of physical material."

Paul Backhouse's constructive critique was that "the presentation is not as strong as it could be" - a little editing for cohesion would have assisted in pulling the three pieces together. Matthew Tyler-Jones added that whilst the rendering through watercolour was technically well executed other media might have increased the imact and cohesion of the work.

Overall this piece was praised for it's innovative take on the theme and the technical execution of the watercolour art. We hope to see more fabulous entries by Lynn in the future and hope that other creators can draw inspiration from the technical and artistic approaches put forward here. 


About the Creator

Lynn Copplestone is a early childhood educator with a background in marketing management, opera and watercolour art. 

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Overview

"Roman Baths: Now and Then" seeks to explore the bones of our roman past in Bath, contrasting them to how they look and operate now. The information designed here is intended to be for tourists visiting the Roman Baths. 


The Visualization

The visualization is a video - accompanying images are supplied below. 



Judges Comments

Paul Backhouse commented that this had a "good overall theme, which hangs together well" in a way which Matthew Tyler-Jones "could see being used on-line or in social media by the baths". Ian Kirkpatrick and Imran Ali commented that the piece had good cohesion and direction and that the approach to the bones of our past being embedded in architecture was interesting. 

For constructive critique Paul said that "as a viewer I need a little more time to see the images before they changed". Ian and Imran echoed theese statements expanding that matching the music to the jumps in image would have added polish. 

All of the judges were exceptionally impressed to see the creativity shown by Zoë at this stage of her university progression - the #THJ2017 team look forward to following her future creative pursuits. 


About the Creator

Zoë Newth is a student at Bath Spa University. She wanted to relate the past to the present by contrasting what the differences look like, using the Roman Baths as an example.

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Overview

This piece is a work in progress that seeks to explore a 3D representation of a back-to-back house for communities in the Harehills district. The interactive model aims to explore the different time-frames in detail, from a range of different perspectives. 


The Visualization

Presented below is a screenshot of the piece in action - a download and source file are avaliable below as well. 

Capture.PNG


Source

A .rvt file will download upon clicking the above link.


Judges Comments

Paul Backhouse, Matthew Tyler-Johnson, Imran Ali and Ian Kirkpatrick all commented that this project was an interesting start with great promise. Matthew enjoyed potential that this project had for "bringing together historical data and collected personal reminiscence" which Imran expanded upon saying that the potential of this project to highlight the "stories of the people that affected the change in the housing of Harehills, perhaps exploring immigration and changing family/household structures" was both significant and innovative. 

For constructive critique our judges all agreed that the addition of texture or colour would help with capturing the viewers attention. Imran and Ian also commented that the piece was an exciting use of digital tools, but required some further development to really facilitate engagement with the "human story and journey" outlined in the paradata. 

The #THJ2017 team enjoyed how the creator had leveraged their experience as an architect to help inform the structure and flow of the heritage visualisation - it was commented that this kind of interdisciplinary work has a great deal of exciting potential. We look forward to seeing how this project develops in the future!


About the Creator

Joanne Harrison is a chartered architect who is undertaking PhD research about the late Victorian / early Edwardian back-to-back houses in Leeds, and this entry is her first heritage visualisation in a research context.

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Overview

This resource is meant to give a brief description of some of the interesting but ‘invisible’ pieces of heritage found on the Bath Spa campus. The idea is that it could perhaps be used as a part of another website for the university to supplement the material that is often overlooked in existing promotional material.


The Visualization

The visualization is presented as a webpage which you can access by clicking this link - some supplementary images are supplied below in addition. 



Judges Comments

All of our judges enjoyed the idea of uncovering invisible or overlooked elements of the Bath Spa campus and commended Alice for taking on a ditigal project with technical aspects. Imran Ali commented that he though the piece demonstrated "good intent and idea" in a way which "filled in gaps about a place's history and provide a new perspective." Matthew Tyler-Jones added that "the creator has chosen an elegant design template" that reflected the theme being engaged with in an appropriate manner. 

For constructive critique Ian Kirkpatrick commented that a standard template for accessing images, video and text would assist in developing consistency throughout the site, whilst Imran Ali stated that more information - especially information which linked physical heritage to themes - would add further interest for readers. Matthew Tyler-Jones encouraged the creator to "explore “the crab man”’s countertourism. A counter tourist view of sites like these would be a fun website."

The entire #THJ2017 team was excited to see such mature engagement with the theme alongside the use of technical, digital skills in heritage. We very much hope to see more of Alice's creative projects soon!


About the Creator

Alice Rickard is a student at Bath Spa University. 

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Overview

This piece is a work in progress that aims to explore how genetic material present present in an organism or cell can inform us about a person's past - to create an interface that demonstrates diversity through an accessible, multimedia approach. Presented here are the first steps towards this vision - a short film and a storyboard - the accompanying paradata expands how this project will unfold in the future.  


The Visualization

storyboard (1).png


Judges Comments

Paul Backhouse commented that this was an "excellent interpretation of the theme, with an audience focussed approach" adding that it was also  "engaging and well presented." The interactive detective story was a great basis for exploring the themes of mobility and interactivity for Matthew Tyler-Jones, a sentiment echoed by Ian Kirkpatrick and Imran Ali who were intrigued at the possibility of using genetic material as a design substrate to explore the given themes. 

For constructive critique all of the judges mentioned that they would have liked to see more cohesion in the humour and visual style between the elements presented. Imran Ali further commenting that at times the narrative in the video was a little hard to follow and that perhaps the inclusion of some brief captions may have assisted.  

Overall this piece showed a great deal of creative capacity and innovation. The judges, as well as the #THJ2017 team, enjoyed the initial steps that this project had taken into a fascinating theme. We look forward to seeing how this project develops in the future!


About the Creators

Lexi Baker, MSc Archaeological Information Studies student at the University of York who is fascinated by all things Augmented Reality. https://pastmeetspresentblog.wordpress.com/ 

Ashley Fisher, A Visitor Experience Host with the Jorvik Group who likes to study and talk about medieval monks, since she cannot be one herself.

Leontien Talboom, Digital Archivist at the ADS, loves anything the predates me, especially windmills

Teagan Zoldoske, A confused Californian who really likes making historical maps

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Overview

judgeschoice.png

This piece explores how our bones support us in life and death - in the visualizatin you open up an attic filled with archived cases and trunks which hold bone artefacts and envelopes of photos from the mid-1700s that reveal the remains of human activity within corseted bodices, crochet hooks and a bone-stick fan. 

Cassie's incredible artwork was awarded the judge's choice award, by not one, but two of our judges. Both Matthew Tyler-Jones and Izzy Bartley selected this stunning work as their stand-out entry - read on below to find out why!


The Visualization

HJ Page 3ccf Layers_txt.jpg

Images of the work in progress can be ovserved in the gallery above



Judges Comments

All of our judging panel thoroughly enjoyed this brilliantly constructed piece. Matthew Tyler-Jones commented that this was an "excellent use of paper engineering that brings a playful sense of discovery to the story." Paul Backhouse added that "the detail of the illustrations draws the viewer into the piece." Ian Kirkpatrick and Imran Ali loved the "strong tactile approach" and that the use of 3D added a great deal intrigue and demonstrated huge potential. 

For constructive critique Matthew wondered if there was the potnetial for the piece to be extended, allowing for "downloadable printable files, and instructions on how to make your own." Imran felt like "the model was one possible instance of a series of places or situations" and hoped that the idea could be implemented in further scenarios for further themes, stating "I'm intrigued to see more!" 

All of our #THJ2017 team loved the craft and quality of the illustrations. The novel approach of combining 2D art with 3D made this a standout piece and we can't wait to see more fabulous pieces by Cassie in the future!


Awards

When selecting this piece Matthew Tyler-Jones said "I can't help it. I'm just a sucker for some paper engineering."

Izzy Bartley stated that: "I love the imagery that this project suggests, of a curious rummage through an attack, and the idea of being able to gain glimpses of objects before 'discovering' them. The multiple interpretations of 'bones' provides for interesting juxtapositions. I can see this working both as a hands-on installation in a gallery and also as a digital interactive."


About the Creator

Past in Pencil and Paint is a strand of Cassie’s freelance practice in inclusive design and interpretation (Access and Museum Design). She works with people to access and engage with their heritage in creative ways, visualising the past in paper folding, drawing and painting. Cassie is also a sessional tutor with Norfolk Community Learning Services.

 Email: cassiehs@btinternet.com 

 www.cassiehs.com

 FB: CassieHistoricalIllustration

Twitter: @CassieHSart

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Overview

"Unnamed" is a two pannelled, semi-autobiographical artwork in progress. The two panels are meant to be viewed simultaneously, and explore the juxtaposition between the body at the point of burial and the point of excavation. Organic objects that appear in the first are notably absent in the second panel, being notable in their absence. The panels ask you to think about elements that can be significant in life - gender identity, neurodiversity, disability and illness - that are not always evidenced by the osteological record alone. 


The Visualization

Unnamed.jpg


Judges Comments

Paul Backhouse commented that the "interpretation of the theme is really strong in this piece, showing both strong artistic skill and delivery." Matthew Tyler-Jones adding that the construction of the piece was "evocative". Imran Ali described the presentation as "provocative and poetic" further stating that it "raised some interesting questions and encouraged the viewer to explore further." Ian Kirkpatrick rounded out the judges commentary stating that it was "aesthetically intriguing and well executed. Intriguing, even if you don't understand the story behind the work."

For constructive critique the judges were unanimous in wanting to see more, with Matthew stating that he "would like to see a whole (short) sketchbook of similar diptychs." Ian expanded that he would have loved to see the pieces in higher resolution with some photos taken up-close to see the detail better. With regards to the paradata Imran stated that "it would've been great to hear more of her thoughts on how the digital manifestation Alison mentions might've been implemented."

In all, the piece was eyecatching with exceptionally well executed paradata. It tackled complex themes and left us all wanting more. We will follow Alison's future creative endeavours with excitment. 


About the Creator

Alison Atkin is an osteoarchaeologist and illustrator, currently writing up her PhD at the University of Sheffield and working freelance on projects across the heritage and education sectors.

Twitter: @alisonatkin

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Overview

"Grave Wandering"  is both a digital portfolio, and a home for one branch of a project taking place in the Emanu-El Cemetery in Victoria, B.C., Canada.


The Visualization

You can engage with the website yourself by clicking here! A series of images are also included here to give a taste on what is on offer. 




Judges Comments

Paul Backhouse commented that this piece had a "lovely design" that was "simple and elegant, easy to use and easy to read." Matthew Tyler-Jones expanded that it was an "excellent collection of research, RTI imagery and photography to catalogue a gravesite." The impressive paradata of the project was noted by Imran Ali who said that it was "a really strong account of the project's story, the learning and development therein." All of the judges noted that this project has "huge potential to be expanded."
 

For constructive criticism Paul quipped that there was potential to "use thumbnails for quicker loading time - as this would be a useful resource on a mobile phone or tablet in the field." Whilst Ian Kirkpatrick added that integration with digital technology such as google streetview would add further dimentions to the project. 

Overall the judges, as well as #THJ2017 crew, were thoroughly taken by the innovative and practical take on the theme and the technical capacity demonstrated by the creator. We look forward to following the project as it develops further. 


About the Creator

Melanie Heizer is an undergraduate student at the University of Victoria, she has been working in the Emanu-El cemetery for 3.5 years doing digital imaging of burial monuments, and has a morbid fascination with all things death and monument related. Thanks to Dr. Katherine Cook and Dr. Erin McGuire (and Anth 467 for allowing me the use of the cemetery data).

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Overview

"Built on Bones" is an idea for an augmented reality (AR) application that uses geolocated data to situate the user within a network of skeletal cities. It layers our everyday landscapes with the skeletal landmarks of colonialism and challenges those of us who are priviledged enough to escape the everyday landscapes to face our heritage - a way to not just remember, but to reconcile and decolonize the past. 

This incredible piece was awarded the runner up prize in our online, solo competition. Katherine also recieved th judge's choice prize from Imran Ali

Read on to find out more about this inspiring project and engage with our judges comments. Be sure to check out the paradata document for more information on the direction this project will take in future development. 


The Visualization



Judges Comments

The entire #THJ2017 team loved this concept and were captivated by the potential it showed for tackling issues faced within heritage rhetoric. Paul Backhouse stated that it was "an excellent idea and approach to a very real interpretative issue. the approach taken is designed to challenge and make the viewer think. The design is beautiful, creative and well implemented." Imran Ali liked "the subversive nature of the AR experience and the paradata" stating that it "was an exceptionally strong prototype of future development."  

For constructive critique the judges noted the potential to refine the imagery in the app to make it more polished. Matthew Tyler-Jones discussed how an app might also cause barriers for use, given the need to download and use technology - something that all of us engaged in digital creativity grapple with. Additionally Imran was "interested in discussing further how the app can open dialogue, reconciliation and discourse beyond the AR experience."

The app dealt with difficult heritage themes in a way that was both thought provoking and creative. The potential of this piece to subvert the norm was immediately evident and we look forward to further discussion and development on this fabulous visualization. 


Awards

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KatherineCook.png

Imran Ali selected this for his judge's choice award stating "I loved the subversive tone of this work, drawing attention to the impact of colonialism all around us with an unexpected, subversive and even playful tone. It's a great illustration of where AR could be used to truly offer alternative lenses for exploring the environment around us. It spoke to me on a personal level too, both as a produce of colonial history and as the beneficiary of post-colonial migrations. I also really got a lot from the account of the project's journey that Katherine provided and would love to see the work developed further (maybe with our in-house AR guru!)"


About the Creator

Dr. Katherine Cook is an archaeologist and historian, focused on digital public archaeology and colonial/post-colonial heritage in the Atlantic. She has pursued research and partnerships with museums in Canada, the Caribbean, and the UK and is currently based in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Victoria (on the traditional territory of the WS’ANEC’, Lkwungen, and Wyomilth peoples), where she is a settler/visitor. She is interested in ways in which digital technology can be used to change perspectives on the past to build empathy, community and connection in the present.


She appreciates and acknowledges assistance in editing imaging files by Chrissy Taylor, and all that she has learned about decolonization of heritage from her colleagues, students, and museum partnerships in BC.


Twitter: @KatherineRCook
Email: dr.krcook@gmail.com

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Overview

"The Poetry of Bones" is a mixed media piece which incorporates physical elements as well as watercolour painting to explore how poetry and art intersect. Using the bones of our past as the core theme this visualization touches on ideas of empathy, reverance and respect. 


The Visualization

 

 

 



Judges Comments

Paul Backhouse described the piece as "imaginative, interesting and beautifully presented." Both Matthew Tyler-Jones and Zsolt Sándor complimented the use of the poetry, quipping that "it is very relevant and works well with the artwork as a whole." Izzy Bartley added that "there is a lot of depth and information contained in a single artwork."

For constructive critique the judges would have liked to see "more detail in the paradata, which would have helped to explain all the meanings within the artwork and the background to the piece." And Paul added that it would have been nice to see the physical elements of the piece extended further. 

This piece demonstrated a great deal of creative merit and a novel approach to the theme, blending poetry and traditional artistic methods together to add and explore dimentions outside of the traditional. 


About the Creator

Lynn Copplestone is a early childhood educator with a background in marketing management, opera and watercolour art. 

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick
2 CommentsPost a comment

Overview

"ARtefactKit" is an innovative, multi-sensory augmented reality (AR) application that allows the user to compare an excavated artefact with a number of different artefacts from a 3D virutal reference collection to aid in identification and examination. Through the application you can smell, hear and see the real animals that the artefacts are derived from. 

This visualization was awarded first place in our online, solo section of the competition as well as being selected by Paul Backhouse as his judge's choice award. Read on to find out more about the project and engage with the judges comments!


The Visualization

A video capture of the "ARtefactKit" in action, along with some images are provided below:



Credits


Judges Comments

Our judging panel was absolutely floored by the breadth, potential and execution of this piece. Paul Backhouse commented that it was "incredible", adding that "the approach in this piece is really strong, thinking about multiple levels of usability, and multiple sensory approaches. Using multiple sources of data to create a real resource." Izzy Bartley added that "the depth of this app is very impressive, giving a much more holistic approach to gathering knowledge. I like the way it uses open data for real, meaningful purpose." The potential of the piece was noted by Matthew Tyler-Jones who identified that it could be a "really useful application of ARKit for training, and in the field." Zsolt Sándor adding that he would "love to be able to try this for real."

The constructive critique of our judges was the potential to refine and polish the interface, making it more cohesive throughout. Paul also was intrigued by the possibility of this being rolled out to google cardboard for wider access. 

This is a truly astounding piece that tackles the "bones of our past" theme in a way that demonstrates exceptional technical merit and solves a real world heritage problem. Our entire judging panel, as well as the #THJ2017 team, were so impressed by the work and hope to be able to play with it ourselves in the future!


Awards

Solo-First.png

Paul Backhouse selected this piece "for using so many different sources of information, the effort and the thought, the approach to solving a real world problem and the inventiveness"


About the Creator

Stuart Eve has been a commercial archaeologist with L – P : Archaeology since 2000. He is very interested in multi-sensory approaches to the study of past people, and also investigating how Mixed Reality may be used in archaeological fieldwork.

Twitter: @stueve

http://www.lparchaeology.com

http://www.dead-mens-eyes.org

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Overview

"History in Bones" leverages bioanthropological to raise questions to the viewer about what we can learn from the bones of our past. 


The Visualization

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You can download the visualization, in powerpoint form by clicking here. 



Judges Comments

Our judges were really impressed at the depth of questioning this piece. Paul Backhouse commented that "this is a really good start, and you have raised some interesting questions" with Matthew Tyler-Jones adding that it is "a nice typographical approach" that has the basis for a further reaching and engaging project. 

For constructive critique Paul said to "keep going back and exploring those questions. Explore in your own way and use the talents you have". Imran Ali and Ian Kirkpatrick added that it would be great to see interactivity added to the piece so that more information and engagement could be leveraged. 

The piece is a really strong start that explores the theme in a meaningful way - the potential is evident and we look forward to see what Julie creates in the future!


About the Creator

Julie Pybus is a History student at Bath Spa University

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Overview

"Who was Richard III" is a informative video that examines the bones of the past through the lens of the prolific figure of Richard III.


The Visualization

pic for gallery.png



Judges Comments

Our panel of judges highly commended the way in which Molly created a visualization for a clearly identified audience. Zsolt Sándor commented that "the content is appropriate for the audience and it achieves its objectives well." Izzy Bartley added that "this is well thought out and decisions that have been made are justified well in the paradata. I also think it achieves its objectives well." Matthew Tyler-Jones enjoyed that the piece effectively "highlighted the difference between public perception and archeological evidence in a short video."

For constructive critique the judges explored the potential of narration in the video to cut down on the amount of text present within a given frame.  

Overall this piece shows a great deal of potential and technical merit - we look forward to seeing the creative projects that Molly produces in the future!


About the Creator

Molly Ashmeade is a student at Bath Spa University taking an undergraduate History and Heritage course. She chose this presentation subject because she likes picking apart the many layers of history and because the Tudors and Stuarts are my favourite time period.

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Overview

"Assemblage" is an archaeological card game that, through play, encourages the player to think archaeologically. The game is avaliable for you to download and play, so what are you waiting for? Grab the files and have a go!


The Visualization



Source Files

If you want to have your own set of W.T.F simply download and print the following files:

  1. Cards: Artifact Deck
  2. Cards: Events Deck
  3. Rules
  4. Tokens
  5. Board

Judges Comments

Our judges all really enjoyed the playful approach to archaeology and heritage. Zsolt Sándor commented that it is an "innovative and playful approach to the theme". Whilst Izzy Bartley commented that she "liked the incorporation of fictional storytelling into archaeology." Paul Backhouse went on to say that it was a "really good creative idea, which really aims to get people thinking in a fun way."

For constructive critique the judges felt that "the rules for this game quite difficult to understand" and needed some refinement to make the game easier to jump into. Some additional polish to the visuals would also help with drawing the players in. 

The #THJ2017 team were thrilled to see such a playful engagement with the past and look forward to seeing how this great project progresses in the future. 


About the Creator

Andrew Reinhard is an archaeology PhD student at the University of York interested in video game archaeology, specifically how games are artifacts and sites.

Blog: archaeogaming.com

Twitter: @adrenhard and @archaeogaming

Email: adr520@york.ac.uk

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Overview

Excavation is an archaeological game, where the aim is for the players to excavate a site and tell a story. Each time the game is played you will encounter a different site! The game is currently in an early stage and is not yet playable - but check out the proposed rules of play attatched here!


The Visualization



Judges Comments

The judges all loved the potential that this game showed for exploring archaeology in a playful way. Paul Backhouse quipped that he "loved the idea of an excavation board game, as a concept this shows real promise." Izzy Bartley praised how it created "space for creativity and imagination in interpreting archaeology."

For constructive criticism Paul noted that "you could add every day sexism cards, health and safety audit, redundancy, patronising dig director" to expand the concept. Zsolt Sándor added that he felt "there are too many rules to this game and you would need to be very invested in playing it to learn the rules" - some refinement and polish as the game concept develops would really allow the innovative and creative elements of the game to shine through. 

Once again our judging panel commends Andrew for his fabulous, playful take and offers a lot of encouragement for developing this project further!


About the Creators

Andrew Reinhard is an archaeology PhD student at the University of York interested in video game archaeology, specifically how games are artifacts and sites.

Blog: archaeogaming.com

Twitter: @adrenhard and @archaeogaming

Email: adr520@york.ac.uk

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Overview

"W.T.F" is an action-packed archaeological take on the classic game "Dixit". This game puts you into the shoes of archaeologists in hot debate over the identification of artifacts. The rules, cards and tokens are included on this page - so go on, download it and have a play!


The Visualization



Source Files

If you want to have your own set of W.T.F simply download and print the following files:

  1. Cards
  2. Rules
  3. Tokens
  4. Board

Judges Comments

Ian Kirkpatrick and Imran Ali loved the "really interesting, inclusive and original approach" and commended it for being "refreshingly and unabashedly non-digital!" Part of the charm of the game was that it could "be played easily on-site in remote locations" and  "mimics the teacher/student archeological process in a clever way." Paul Backhouse commented that the creation of a game like this was a fabulous and innovative approach to the competition. 

For constructive critique the judges noted that the "rules were more complex than expected, requiring reading rather than a verbal explanation." For future directions the judges hoped to see the visuals refined for a more polished appearance. 

The approach of playful engagement with archaeology is certainly a welcomed one that has observeable potential for heritage visualization. The #THJ2017 team thoroughly enjoyed playing the game and highly reccomend that others download and play it for themselves. 


About the Creator

Andrew Reinhard is an archaeology PhD student at the University of York interested in video game archaeology, specifically how games are artifacts and sites.

Blog: archaeogaming.com

Twitter: @adrenhard and @archaeogaming

Email: adr520@york.ac.uk

 

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Overview

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"Printed Bones" is a video game which takes a novel approach to the "bones of our past" theme. In the game the player is presented with a book of paper cutouts which they can interact with to form the bones of a new narrative. Drawing on famous poetry and imagery this interactive experience allows you to play with the bones of the past in a truly novel way. 

This fabulous piece was awarded the runner up prize in our online, team category. Read on below to find out more about this project. Be sure to play it yourself and also to read the judges feedback to unpick the fantastic technical, artistic and creative aspects of this project. 


The Visualization

Printed Bones is a videogame - to play it yourself you will need to either:

Below are a series of images taken from the game to give you a taste of what it is like!


Instructions

  • Download, Unzip, and Open the folder “PrintedBones(ver1.0) - HeritageJam2017”.
  • Open the file “PrintedBones(ver1.0).exe”. A new window will appear.
  • If necessary, you can change the display and input settings on this window. We recommend playing on the default settings.
  •  Hit the “Play!” button on the lower right corner and the game should start.


Judges' Comments

The technical and artistic merit of this piece was highly commended by our panel of judges, with Paul Backhouse stating that it was "beautifully created and lovingly illustrated. Matthew Tyler-Jones added that he "could see this being an activity in a museum gallery". Izzy Bartley and Zsolt Sándor added that it was a visually pleasing piece that drew the player in, with Zsolt adding that he "liked the convergence of archaeology and poetry. It makes one think about history and archaeology from a different perspective."

For constructive critique the judges noted that this would be a fabulous application on a iPad and hoped that it could be rolled out onto this platform. Izzy added that at times the layering of the images meant you missed out on some of the poetry. 

This piece was a pleasure to play and engage with - our judging panel and #THJ2017 team are greatly looking forward to seeing what Almudena and Manuel create next!


Awards

TEAM-RunnerUp.png

Acknowledgements

This video game is free, and it cannot be commercially distributed.

All images used are available online as Public Domain Marked images.

The poems are included under fair use as part of a re-mixed artistic piece and as educational material (serious game).


About the Creators:

Almudena Martínez

Roles: Design and Research.

Bio: Historian specialized in heritage, historical libraries, and ancient books.

Links: Academia.edu

 

Manuel Cruz

Roles: Design and Programming.

Bio: Historian and Educator, doing experiments with video games.

Links: @ManuACruz

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Overview

"Old Bones Daily" procedurally generates texts from the 'bones' of generative grammar. The structure of the grammar used to generate the piece explores arguments often made about human bones, extending these into the digital and creative space. Have a look below for examples, and follow the links provided to explore "Old Bones Daily" for yourself!

This piece was awarded first place in our online, team category as well as the judge's choice award from Zsolt Sándor. Read below for more information on this fabulous project and to engage with the judges comments that explore the merits of this piece. Be sure to check out the paradata and have a play with the source which has been provided so that you can also have a go at creating your own fabulous visualizations!


The Visualization

Instructions for access:

•           Visit online at http://shawngraham.github.io/hj2017

•           Make your browser full-screen for best effect

•           Fully responsive so can be read equally well on mobile

•           Reload the page for the latest headlines and stories and photos

OldBonesDaily.PNG
OldBonesDaily2.PNG


Source Files

To replicate this newspaper for your own amusement, consult the file, newsgrammar.js and insert new values in the keys. To alter the layout and placement of these elements on the newspaper, create new var and associated div in the js\app.js file. Place the div in the appropriate location in the main index.html file. Extra css or html for a particular chunk of text should be wrapped inside the values in the newsgrammar.js file. For a tutorial on how Tracery functions, see Shawn Graham's tutorial at The Programming Historian. Tracery can power webpages, games, and twitterbots. What would be the effect of 'Old Bones Daily' if it were translated into the new news medium of Twitter?


Acknowledgements

The original CSS for the newspaper layout is MIT Licensed by user Silkine on codepen.io

The Tracery generative grammar is released by Kate Compton under Apache License Version 2.0, January 2004

Images obtained via the British Library’s Flickr stream are all public domain works

We assert that our use of the original source newspapers is fair use

We release the code in the source repository into the wild, such parts of it that are uniquely ours, under CC BY.


Judges Comments

The entire juding panel thoroughly commended the technical merits and innovative use of paradata within the piece. Paul Backhouse commented that it was "beautifully presented and laid out." and that he loved "the way the Paradata is folded into the virtual newspaper." Matthew Tyler-Jones quipped that it was an "excellent example of Tracery" that he "could play with it for hours. (And did, for too long.)" Izzy Bartley expanded that she "really likes the idea of this being a kind of 'potluck' experience, never knowing what you're going to get next. I can envisage people signing up to receive an 'Old Bones Daily' email in their inbox." She also really liked "the way it is all based on real, historic news stories."

For constructive critique Izzy Bartley commented that "the paradata is robust, but difficult to understand if you are not familiar with coding or what Tracery grammar is."

This visualization shows incredible technical merit and tackles the theme in an innovative way - our team was inspired and left wanting to play with it more!


Awards

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When selecting this for his judge's choice award Zsolt Sándor said: "This was a really playful and clever interpretation of the theme, using technology in a novel and interesting way to bring us closer to the past in an informative, yet entertaining fashion. Well presented, too."


About the Creators

Shawn Graham is a Roman archaeologist cum digital humanist in the Department of History at Carleton University, who hails from the wilds of the Ottawa Valley and still reads the Shawville Equity every week.

Kate Ellenberger is a digital public archaeologist with a background in public outreach, museum work, mapping and databases currently working towards the PhD in anthropological archaeology at Binghamton University. She enjoys far too many cat memes on the interwebs.

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Overview

The bones of our past can manifest in many ways - in this piece the creator explores the theme through the lens of "a basic or essential framework of something". Using social media as the basis this piece explores how we can situate memories into landscapes, allowing us to visualize our personal framework of place and experience. 


The Visualization

The visualization is presented as a website, with a video and image as supporting data below. 

Click here to visit the website. 


Additional Acknowledgements

Additional CC/Acknowledgement Note: Leaflet, Mapbox, Instagram



Judges Comments

Our judging team were intrigued at how this took a familiar social media platform and challenged how we engage with the bones of our past through it. Zsolt Sándor commented that it was a "great interpretation of the theme with an interesting and creative approach. This project takes a familiar social media platform and reworks it into a new perspective." Izzy Bartley further commented that it was a highly "creative application of existing social media content with excellent paradata to back it up."

For constructive critique our judges noted that more pins would have added depth to the piece. 

The judges enjoyed the technical merits of the piece and noted that there is a great potential to use this platform for probing how memories and tagged and engaged with on social media. We hope to see this platform get further use and look forward to seeing how Anna develops it in the future!


About the Creator

I am Anna Heckadon, an Anthropology student at the University of Victoria. This is my first time participating in The Heritage Jam; one of my professors told the class about it. 

https://annaheckadon.github.io/Annathropology_/

https://twitter.com/Annathropology_

https://www.linkedin.com/in/anna-heckadon-137548130/

https://github.com/annaheckadon 

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick

Overview

This pamphlet tackles a real-world need to highlight some of the architectural bones of Malvern's past to the local population. Have a read to discover the importance of dressed wells within the area!


The Visualization

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Judges Comments

Paul Backhouse commented that this is an "interesting aspect of heritage, and a good way of engaging people in their local history". Izzy Bartley continues that it is "well laid out, a good balance of information, images and a map" that would be at home as a learning or engagement tool in a museum or heritage location context. 

For constructive critique the judges encouraged William to "think about the map, if you were picking up the leaflet in a library - what would you want the map to show you? does it have enough info on it?" and to engage with creative visualisation to allow the imagery to add to the rhetoric of the piece. 

Our judges were thrilled that William had taken an often overlooked subject manner and made a great start at engaging the public with it through a creative pamphlet. The team looks forward to seeing what William creates in the future!


About the Creator

William Worthington


Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick