Overview

Through the iOS and Android application, Aurasma, this project explores the skeletal remains of King Richard III in augmented reality. The bones of our past are used as trigger points, from which further information can be explored. 


The Visualization

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In Action

Coming soon! During the in-person jam we will have the online entries on display and will record them in action - keep an eye on this space!


Instructions and Set Up

This project runs on the iOS and Android application, Aurasma. In order to access it, the viewer must create an account and follow "M_Mauriello's Public Auras" found by using the "Discover Auras" search bar at the top of the home screen. Once the viewer is following the page, go back to the main home screen and press the small, square purple button on the bottom of the screen. Place the camera over the trigger image to start the interactive activity. This trigger image can be printed, on a computer screen, iPad, almost anything which would make the image recognizable for the camera. 



Judges Comments

Our judges loved how Michaela had identified a need, a target audience and had used her technical capacity to build something informative and exciting. Izzy Bartley commented that she "likes the multi-media content of this" and that "it provides an opportunity for people to explore this highly popular skeleton in a lot of detail." Paul Backhouse added that it was a "really good idea, and well implemented, showing possibilities within the classroom." Matthew Tyler-Jones rounded out the judges comments saying that the piece "demonstrates how AR applications might be used to link to in-depth information" and "encourages everyone" to explore and probe the bones of our past. 

For constructive critique the judges thought that consistency in screen orientation would help with accessibility and ease of use. 

Our team really enjoyed engaging with the app and believed it effectively showcased the potential that this style of visualization might have for education and sharing of information. We highly commend the technical skills demonstrated in creating the piece and hope to see more innovative visualizations created by Michaela soon!


About the Creator

Michaela Mauriello is in her last semester of my Anthropology BA at California State University Long Beach with an interest in funerary rituals, archaeology and 3D reconstruction and visualization. Through the explosion of new technology, she believes that the use of this technology will be a way to preserve and visualize the past better than we have in previous years.

Posted
AuthorIan Kirkpatrick